Explained: When to Knock Down Spider Webs to Improve Results

Explained: When to Knock Down Spider Webs to Improve Results

Explained: When to Knock Down Spider Webs to Improve Results
Share
Share
Share
Print
Email

Should I leave spider webs or knock them down before a spray? Most of my clients think that they should leave spider webs in place for their yearly or six-monthly spider spray. It’s a common misconception, and it used to be the official advice of most pest controllers back in the day. It’s a lot of hard work to dispel this myth!

The short story: if you haven’t had a pest spray for a while, and you’ve got a lot of spider web build-up, you should knock them down before we come. If it’s just a few spider webs here and there, you can leave them up.

At least once a week I have to explain why it’s best to remove the spider webs before I spray for spiders. So I thought I’d write this little article to make my job easier.

Shouldn’t I Leave Spider Webs so the Pest Controller Knows Where to Spray?

If we needed to be shown where to spray for spiders, we wouldn’t be very good at our job!

A good pest controller knows the spider species in their local area. They will know the behaviour and nesting habits and will know exactly where to target their spray application.

A good pest controller will know exactly where to target their spray application.

So there’s no need to leave your spider webs up before your service. You can be confident that a good, professional pest controller knows how to apply pesticides properly to target different pests.

Pest controllers can do a better job of a pest spray if there are no spider webs in the way
A pest controller can do a better job if there are no webs in the way.

Why Should I Clean Webs Down Beforehand?

A spider spray relies on a residue remaining on a surface to provide long-term protection against spiders. A spider has to come in contact with the sprayed surface to pick up a lethal dose.

If there are very thick webs, you’ll get less ongoing protection from future spiders.

If there are very thick webs, more of our product is going to land on the spider web. And less will land on the surface behind it. This means we’ll be able to kill the spider just fine, but you’ll get less ongoing protection from future spiders that want to nest in the same spot down the track.

Spider web in a verandah crevice in Corowa NSW
We can’t get our spray into this crack with the heavy webs in the way. This photo was taken in Corowa, NSW.

What If I Left the Spider Webs Up and I’ve Already Had a Spray Done?

It’s not a big deal, it just means spiders may return to those heavy-webbed areas a little sooner than normal. So, you’ll get a bit less value out of your service.

After the spray, leave any webs for as long as possible before cleaning them down.

After the spray, you should leave your webs in place for as long as possible before cleaning them down. The webs that were there are now part of the residual barrier. So, as soon as you clean them down, there will be less residue for other spiders.

Spider webs very thick on an external light fixture.
You’ll get more value after a spray service if you leave webs in place for as long as possible.

I hope this helps to get the story straight and helps you to get more value out of your regular spider service.

If you want to know more about how to get the best out of your pest sprays, you can call us on 02 6032 7137 or message us.

Read More

Recent Posts:

Bug Bombs: Are They Worth it Or a Waste of Money?

January 18, 20246 Min read

When spiders and insects start getting into your home in Spring and Summer, it's tempting to opt for quick solutions...

Flying Termites: All You Need to Know About Winged White Ants

October 27, 20234 Min read

The sight of flying termites can be alarming, to say the least. These little guys are often a sign of...

Keep Flies Away This Summer With These 5 Effective Tips

October 13, 20236 Min read

House flies (Musca domestica) are a common nuisance in the warmer months in Australia. However, they aren't just an inconvenience,...

Connect with us:

Comments